Category Archives: Mission

prayer essential for revival

A. T. Pierson said, “There has never been a revival in any country that has not begun in united prayer, and no revival has ever continued beyond the duration of those prayer meetings.”

William Larkin, Acts, page 45.

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revival dependent on confession

“Revival is impossible apart from confession of sin among believers. It must be confession to God, and it may be confession to one another. Every hindrance must go. Sin must be confessed in order that it may be cleansed…Judgement must begin at the house of the Lord.” Only a holy people, a repentant and restored people, are vessels fit to be revived.

William Larkin, Acts, page 47-48.


christianity a world religion

Even in its beginnings, the movement of Jesus followers spread out in all directions outward from its Middle Easter origins, not only to Europe, but also to North Africa, to Turkey and Armenia, to Persia and India. “Christianity was a world religion long before it was a European one.” And today again, . . . Christianity is the religion that is most equally distributed across the continents of the world. So “no other [faith] . . . has so extensively crossed the cultural divisions of humanity and found a place in so many diverse cultural contexts.”

Timothy Keller, Making Sense of God, page 229.


the soup that keeps on giving

Back in the late 1950s, Sophie Muller, a blue-eyed, single woman with a background in journalism and art, traveled the rivers and jungles, spending several days each month in each village.

Travel meant sitting on the rough wooden bench of a dugout canoe for days on end, sometimes under the hot tropical sun and other times enduring torrential downpours. At times travel by river was followed by a trek through the dense jungle.

Beyond the mere inconveniences, there was real danger. At one village, the witch doctor cooked up a chicken stew for Sophie with a little something extra added. The villagers watched as the unsuspecting Sophie ate the soup laced with the most potent poison known in the jungle, a poison known to kill a person within five minutes.

The villagers watched and waited for the inevitable – but it didn’t happen. Though Sophie experienced some vomiting, she did not die. And that didn’t make sense. Could the witch doctor have failed? Hadn’t the witch doctor added enough poison to kill five men? Or could the poison be flawed?

If any questions were raised about the potency of the poison, they were soon dispelled when some of the village dogs found Sophie’s vomit and did what dogs do, after which they promptly fell over and died.

God’s protective power was evident, and the witch doctor who had prepared the soup turned from witchcraft to God. Sophie became known as the daughter of God and was allowed to travel safely in the jungle wherever she wanted.

Rosie Cochran, Discipleship Done Well, Ethnos360 Magazine, March, 2018


civilian or soldier

“What we need to ask ourselves today is, ‘Am I a civilian or a soldier?” This is how a civilian thinks: ‘God, I want to do this for you. I have these gifts, these talents and I’m this old and I want to do this for you, God. I love to play music. I want to play music for you.’

“But a soldier says, ‘Tell me what to do with my life. I don’t care what it is. Whatever you want me to do, I will do it.’ There is a tremendous difference.”

David Pierce, Rock Priest, page 254


mobilize for evangelism

Evangelism is not a calling reserved exclusively for the clergy. I believe one of the greatest priorities of the church today is to mobilize the laity to do the work of evangelism.

Billy Graham, Billy Graham in Quotes, p.128


sick people show up

If you pursue a life like the one Jesus demonstrated, one where you join with others and become a church that is truly a hospital for sick people, then guess what? Sick people show up. In my experience, a lot of them show up.

And that’s not all. Not only will sick people show up to churches that are genuinely running after Jesus, but guess what they’ll do when they get there? They will act sick.

Jim Burgen, No More Dragons, p. 164-165


don’t convert culture

In both West and East it is vital for us to learn to distinguish between Scripture and culture, and between those things in culture which are inherently evil and must therefore be renounced for Christ’s sake and those things which are good or indifferent and may therefore be retained, even transformed and enriched.

In the West, according to the authors of God’s Lively People (Fontana 1971),
‘our congregations demand from every new member not only a conversion but also a change in culture. He has to abandon some of his contemporary beliefs and to accept the older patterns prevalent among the majority of the congregation. The new Christian has to learn the old hymns and to appreciate them. He has to learn the language of the pulpit. He has to share in some conservative political opinions. He has to dress a bit oldfashioned… In brief, he has to step back two generations and undergo what one may call a painful cultural circumcision’ (p.206).

Similarly Bishop David Sheppard writes that ‘few are able to be as objective as the shop steward who said that churches require you to do a crash course in middle-class behaviour, rather than to learn Christian maturity’ (Built as a City, p. 50).

John Stott, Christian Mission in the Modern World, p. 122-123.


faith determines all life choices

Even if you are not a secular person, the secular age can “thin out” (secularize) faith until it is seen as simply one more choice in life – along with job, recreation, hobbies, politics – rather than as the comprehensive framework that determines all life choices.

Timothy Keller, Making Sense of God, page 3


how do you follow jesus

The people in your life aren’t expecting you to articulate every nuance of what you believe. In fact, most of them aren’t even asking, “How do you follow Jesus?” Rather, they are asking, “How do you follow Jesus?’

You can answer the first question in an e-mail. Or in a book. But you can only answer the second question by living your life in front of them. By waking up again tomorrow and making choice after gritty choice to take Jesus up on his invitation to follow him.

Jason Mitchell, No Easy Jesus, p.199