Category Archives: Mission

the riches of Christ

One of the most fascinating of all the preacher’s tasks is to explore both the emptiness of fallen man and the fullness of Jesus Christ, in order then to demonstrate how he can fill our emptiness, lighten our darkness, enrich our poverty, and bring our human aspirations to fulfillment. The riches of Christ are unfathomable.

John Stott, Between Two Worlds, p. 154.

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how to address pride month

Beauty Beyond Bones is a blog site I have been following for a few years now. This is a young woman who is a strong Catholic, loves Jesus and is a recovered(recovering) victim of an eating disorder. Her thoughts on how to handle pride month are very well thought out.

beautybeyondbones.com/2019/06/13/are-we-worshiping-our-sexuality-pridemonth/


the largest of hidden people groups

Today this message [to repent and turn to God] is vital to the eternal destiny of not only ethnic children of Abraham, the Jews, but also that largest of hidden people groups, nominal Christians. If 75-80 percent of the world’s Christians are Christian in name only, then one billion people need to be awakened out of their “smug assurance of salvation by biological birthright.”

William J. Larkin, Jr., Acts, p. 70


decisions that don’t make sense…

It is imperative, then, that we behold the Person of Jesus as revealed through every page of Scripture from beginning to end. What we discover about Him will orient our lives around His light like planets around the blazing sun; inevitably, revelation of who He is will lead us to make decisions that don’t make sense unless we will be raised from the dead.

Stephanie Quick, To Trace a Rising Sun, page 19-20.


none felt called to preach

[Alexander] Duff and his friends were provoked by men like William Cary, who’d sailed to the other side of the world to tell people who didn’t know about Jesus about Jesus. They dug into the Scriptures, read a bunch of missionary biographies, prayed together, ate together, and wrestled through it all together. Many of them concluded the burden of responsibility for stewarding the Good News of the Gospel of the Kingdom fell upon them simply because they were members and ambassadors of the Kingdom. None felt called to preach or pioneer. They just couldn’t shake the testimony of the Word of God that Jesus was worth it and the unreached deserve it.

Stephanie Quick, To Trace a Rising Sun, page 10.


prayer essential for revival

A. T. Pierson said, “There has never been a revival in any country that has not begun in united prayer, and no revival has ever continued beyond the duration of those prayer meetings.”

William Larkin, Acts, page 45.


revival dependent on confession

“Revival is impossible apart from confession of sin among believers. It must be confession to God, and it may be confession to one another. Every hindrance must go. Sin must be confessed in order that it may be cleansed…Judgement must begin at the house of the Lord.” Only a holy people, a repentant and restored people, are vessels fit to be revived.

William Larkin, Acts, page 47-48.


christianity a world religion

Even in its beginnings, the movement of Jesus followers spread out in all directions outward from its Middle Easter origins, not only to Europe, but also to North Africa, to Turkey and Armenia, to Persia and India. “Christianity was a world religion long before it was a European one.” And today again, . . . Christianity is the religion that is most equally distributed across the continents of the world. So “no other [faith] . . . has so extensively crossed the cultural divisions of humanity and found a place in so many diverse cultural contexts.”

Timothy Keller, Making Sense of God, page 229.


the soup that keeps on giving

Back in the late 1950s, Sophie Muller, a blue-eyed, single woman with a background in journalism and art, traveled the rivers and jungles, spending several days each month in each village.

Travel meant sitting on the rough wooden bench of a dugout canoe for days on end, sometimes under the hot tropical sun and other times enduring torrential downpours. At times travel by river was followed by a trek through the dense jungle.

Beyond the mere inconveniences, there was real danger. At one village, the witch doctor cooked up a chicken stew for Sophie with a little something extra added. The villagers watched as the unsuspecting Sophie ate the soup laced with the most potent poison known in the jungle, a poison known to kill a person within five minutes.

The villagers watched and waited for the inevitable – but it didn’t happen. Though Sophie experienced some vomiting, she did not die. And that didn’t make sense. Could the witch doctor have failed? Hadn’t the witch doctor added enough poison to kill five men? Or could the poison be flawed?

If any questions were raised about the potency of the poison, they were soon dispelled when some of the village dogs found Sophie’s vomit and did what dogs do, after which they promptly fell over and died.

God’s protective power was evident, and the witch doctor who had prepared the soup turned from witchcraft to God. Sophie became known as the daughter of God and was allowed to travel safely in the jungle wherever she wanted.

Rosie Cochran, Discipleship Done Well, Ethnos360 Magazine, March, 2018


civilian or soldier

“What we need to ask ourselves today is, ‘Am I a civilian or a soldier?” This is how a civilian thinks: ‘God, I want to do this for you. I have these gifts, these talents and I’m this old and I want to do this for you, God. I love to play music. I want to play music for you.’

“But a soldier says, ‘Tell me what to do with my life. I don’t care what it is. Whatever you want me to do, I will do it.’ There is a tremendous difference.”

David Pierce, Rock Priest, page 254